Michelin Defender VS Firestone Affinity HP

Choosing the right tire brand can be a difficult decision, so let’s compare Firestone and Michelin as a first step.

          Versus       
Michelin Defender                                    FIRESTONE AFFINITY

Cost
Cost plays a part in every decision. That’s why we’re putting this category up front for easy access. Anyway, the Michelin Defender tire is going to run you about $130. This is a pretty standard price. That being said, it seems Firestone likes to surpass expectations, pricing their Affinity tire at $127.99.

Every dollar counts, right?

Handling
Since we’re comparing all-season tires, I’m going to let you in on the facts for multiple driving situations. In a dry, warm climate, you’re not going to be experiencing any issues with either tire. Driving will be a dream. For the Michelin tires, experiencing rain or sleet is little different. But the Firestones, on the other hand, they have some serious issues adjusting to bad climate. In snow—and to a lesser extent rain—their response time shoots down and sometimes you may even find your car completely sedentary.

Wear Life
Michelin offers a substantially superior warranty for tire tread at 80,000 miles guaranteed. If you’d like a frame of reference, Goodyear does the same for their products. However, Firestone doesn’t provide the same assurance with their Affinities. Their treadwear warranty only promises 70,000 miles.

Fuel Efficiency
With what they call their “Energy Saver Construction,” Michelin tires are a great option in terms of fuel economy. I’d be hard pressed to call them the best, though, because they weren’t specifically designed for the task.

In comparison, it’s clear that Firestone had the goal of achieving great fuel economy with their tires. Compared to Michelin (and Goodyear, too), these tires exceed the ordinary fuel savings.

Warranty
Treadwear warranty are a great benefit, but it’s always nice to have something extra. Something to reassure you. Like a trial period, for example. After you buy their tires, Michelin and Firestone offer a 30-day period to make sure you like them. If not, returns are hassle free.

Michelin does have one extra, very admirable amenity, though, and that’s their 3-year help service. If within the time frame, Michelin will replace your flat tires and even tow your car without charge.

Which Is Best?
Safety, in my opinion, is the most important factor to consider. That’s why I can look past Michelin’s somewhat higher price and lower fuel efficiency in favor of their excellent handling in all kinds of weather. Additionally, their better warranty and after-purchase services are second to none.

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